A group of African American women (members of the "Smart Set Club") pose on a staircase
About the image
Scurlock Studio Records, ca. 1905-1994, Archives Center, National Museum of American History

Her story is your story.

Muriel Siebert smiling while seated at a desk
I took a seat at the table.
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Muriel Siebert

Finanicer

I ARRIVED IN New York with $500, a used Studebaker and a dream. As a financial analyst, I earned 60 percent of what men were paid. I asked a client where I could go to find equal pay. He said, “You won’t. Buy a seat. Work for yourself.”

My application for a seat on the New York Stock Exchange turned Wall Street upside down. Never had a woman applied.

I bought the seat. In 1967, I was the only woman among 1,365 men. Within six months, I had a legitimate office. You have to have faith in yourself and believe “I can do it.”

Muriel Siebert’s portrait is at the Smithsonian. It will be used to tell her story and other women’s stories of challenging the rules.

Credits

Photo: Muriel Siebert, the 38-year-old analyst, is pleased at hearing she was elected to the New York Stock Exchange, January 16, 1968. Getty Images, Bettman/Contributor

Content: Muriel Siebert, “Muriel Siebert: First Lady of Wall Street,” Makers Profile, 2013

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The American Women’s History Initiative will amplify women’s voices to honor the past, inform the present and inspire the future.

Bella Abzug (in hat), Betty Freidan (right, in trench coat) and Billie Jean King (far right) accompany torch relay runners into Houston, 1977. Unknown photographer; National Archives
About the image
Bella Abzug (in hat), Betty Freidan (right, in trench coat) and Billie Jean King (far right) accompany torch relay runners into Houston, 1977. Unknown photographer; National Archives.