Women’s history is learned by sharing stories of women.

The American story contains infinite stories, some widely known, and many waiting to be uncovered and shared. Women’s experiences and contributions are as vast as the multitudes they contain. When the facts of the past combine with lived experience, history is transformed.
 
The Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum expands the story of America through the often-untold accounts and accomplishments of women—individually and collectively—to better understand our past and inspire our future. Through new stories, we all benefit from a deeper historical understanding of our nation.

#WomensHistoryIs a movement that claims the value and importance of every woman’s story. What does women’s history mean to you? Share a story of a woman from your family, your community, or from the past who inspired you to think differently.

A story of a woman is a story of America. Women’s history is American history.

Share Your Story

A Woman Who Inspires Me: My Grandmother Peaches Arlene Morris

Monique M. Chism, Smithsonian’s Undersecretary for Education, discusses how she is inspired by her grandmother, Peaches Arlene Morris.

Congresswoman Patsy Mink

Representative Doris Matsui, California congresswoman and Smithsonian Regent, discusses how she is inspired by former congresswoman Patsy Mink, the first woman of color elected to the US House of Representatives and the first Asian American woman to serve in Congress.

Former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt

Anthea M. Hartig, the Elizabeth MacMillan Director of the Smithsonian National American History Museum, discusses how she is inspired by former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt.

NASA Scientist Katherine Johnson

Ellen Stofan, Smithsonian’s Undersecretary for Science and Research, discusses how she is inspired by Katherine Johnson, one of the first African American women to work as a NASA scientist. She is best known for calculating the flight path for America's first astronaut launched into space.

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor

Julissa Marenco, Smithonian’s Assistant Secretary for Communications and External Affairs, discusses how she is inspired by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.